Unraveling Depression: When Your Body’s Defenses Go Rogue

Lauro Amezcua-Patino, MD, FAPA.
3 min readNov 18, 2023

by: Lauro Amezcua-Patino, MD, FAPA.

by: Lauro Amezcua-Patino, MD, FAPA.

Imagine your immune system as a well-intentioned superhero who sometimes gets the plot wrong. That’s a bit like what happens with chronic inflammation and depression. It’s a tale of defense mechanisms, brain chemistry, and a pinch of mystery. Let’s dive into this intriguing story and see how our body’s quest to protect us might be inadvertently playing a role in depression.

Depression: Not Just a Case of the ‘Blues’

Think of depression as more than just having a bad day or a case of the ‘Monday blues’. It’s like a radio stuck on a melancholic station, with the volume control lost. Traditional science has long tuned into the ‘Brain Chemistry Broadcast’ to understand this, focusing on neurotransmitters — the body’s chemical messengers like serotonin (the feel-good DJ) and dopamine (the beat that keeps you moving).

Inflammation: Your Body’s Overzealous Guard Dog

Inflammation is like your body’s own guard dog, meant to protect and defend. But what if Fido starts barking at every passing car or squirrel? That’s chronic inflammation for you — an overreaction to stress, lifestyle, and environmental factors. It’s helpful when it’s a response to an injury (like swelling when you sprain an ankle) but troublesome when it goes into overdrive.

by: Lauro Amezcua-Patino, MD, FAPA.

Connecting Dots: Inflammation Meets Depression

So, how do these seemingly different stories — one of a guard dog (inflammation) and the other of a melancholic radio (depression) — intertwine? Imagine tiny molecules called cytokines (the body’s inflammatory messengers) mistakenly knocking on the brain’s door, disrupting the chemical harmony and leading to mood changes, akin to changing the radio station to ‘Gloomy Weather FM’.

The Neuroendocrine Twist: A Hormonal Whodunit

Now, add a twist to our tale with the neuroendocrine system — think of it as the body’s communication network that uses hormones to send messages. Chronic inflammation can hijack this network, significantly impacting the HPA axis…

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Lauro Amezcua-Patino, MD, FAPA.

Dr. Lauro Amezcua-Patiño: Bilingual psychiatrist, podcaster, clinical leader, educator, and researcher. Expert in forensic medicine and mental health issues.